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Agenda

 
 

Business Language Conference Agenda | CIBER Associate Director's Meeting Agenda

(Subject to change)

All sessions take place in the Biddle Hotel and Conference Center, Indiana University, Bloomington except for the gala dinner.

Thursday, April 4th
3:00 pm – 6:00 pm Registration and Information
East Lounge

5:30 pm – 7:30 pm Welcome Reception
Tudor Room


Friday, April 5th
7:45 am – 4:30 pm Registration and Information
Tree Suite Conference Lounge

7:00 am – 8:00 am Breakfast
Frangipani Room

8:15 am – 8:30 am Welcome and Opening Remarks, Bruce Jaffee, Director, IU CIBER
Whittenberger Auditorium

8:30 am – 9:30 am Opening Plenary Session
Whittenberger Auditorium

Michael Guest, Linguistics and Culture: Unbending the Global Curve

9:30 am – 10:00 am Break
Frangipani Room

10:00 am – 11:00 am Concurrent Session I

Spanish
Location: Dogwood Room
Managing Depth and Breadth in the Business Spanish Course
Tony Houston, Bryant University

The presentation demonstrates an approach to Business Spanish course development that provides opportunities for learners to explore their own interests with a high degree of autonomy, while gaining mastery of the foundations. In this approach, learners work creatively, collaboratively and mindfully in a way that promotes deep learning through novel application of material to personally meaningful tasks.

Differences between Academic and Business Writing in Spanish
Félix S. Vásquez, College of Charleston

Today, most US universities require undergraduate Spanish majors and minors to take a composition course aimed at preparing students to write academic essays in the literature, culture, and linguistic courses down the sequence. A business writing course is rarely required. Yet, as this presentation will highlight, academic and business writings differ widely in terms of content, form, purposes, and readership.

Best Practices
Location: Sassafras Room
The Use of English as a Lingua Franca in International Business: Native and Non-Native Speakers
Orlando R. Kelm, University of Texas at Austin

This session examines the characteristics and use of English as a lingua franca in International Business. We examine how both native- and non-native speakers use English, including strategies to be understood and communicate more effectively. We conclude with recommendations and a discussion about how to apply this knowledge in terms of both foreign language teaching and communication strategies.

French
Location: Redbud Room
Enhancing Experiential Learning in a Course on International Business in French
Marie-Pascale Pieretti, Drew University

This session showcases a course on international business in French that promotes experiential learning. The course described aims at enhancing French oral and written skills related to the world of business, economics, and finance, in a variety of Francophone contexts. It offers a language practicum in Québec city and proposes case studies of social entrepreneurship in French-speaking Africa.

Website Translation and Localization for Francophone Markets: Best practices and Pedagogical Applications
Elizabeth Martin, California State University, San Bernardino

This presentation explores the latest trends in Web localization, highlighting how multinational corporations are adjusting their global marketing strategies to take into account the socio-cultural specificities and preferences of their different target audiences. A variety of interactive and collaborative learning activities for the business French classroom, focusing on international marketing and advertising, will be provided.

Chinese
Location: Hoosier Room
BLRT 2012 Winner:
Ensuring Quality and Excellence of Business Chinese Program through Utilization-Focused Program Evaluation
Haidan Wang, University of Hawaii

This presentation introduces an internally-motivated business language program evaluation project with focus on utilization of the research result. By implementing a progress-oriented approach, this study analyzes data from prioritized stakeholders both quantitatively and qualitatively, and shows evidence for the value of the program. This research is expected to provide a feasible model of evaluating language program for special purposes.

11:00 am – 11:30 am Break
Frangipani Room

11:30 am – 12:30 pm Concurrent Session II

Spanish
Location: Dogwood Room
BLRT 2012 Winner:
Teaching Spanish for Business through Case Studies
Marta Camps, George Washington University

This presentation will report on the work in progress project that we (a team of four) have undertaken during the past year to build a “Spanish for Business” course through the innovative approach of teaching this specialty language using real case studies, built on interviews and data from native speakers working in USA and Spain.

Best Practices
Location: Sassafras Room
Using Mobile Devices for Effective Development of Oral Communication
Skills
Masashi Kato, University of Washington

It is always a difficult task for language instructors to monitor many
students’ oral performance (e.g., conversation and oral reports) and to give them timely feedback. The presenter introduces his method in which he gathers oral performance of all the students at once in a regular classroom setting using their mobile devices such as smart phones and handheld computers.

Less Commonly Taught Languages
Location: Redbud Room
What Can Be Done in Eight Weeks? Lessons from a Crash-Course in Culture
Peter Nemes, Indiana University, Bloomington
Valeria Varga, Indiana University, Bloomington

We will explore the limits of transmitting cultural knowledge during a class phase that prepares business students for a trip abroad. Learning about both the language and culture of the target country enables students to get the full benefit of the experimental learning experience. Both the advantages and shortfalls of our approach will be explored.

Business Language Course Development Based on Task-Based Language Teaching Principles for Less Commonly Taught Languages
Peyman Nojoumian, University of Southern California
In this presentation, I will explain some of the main principles of communicative Task-based Language Teaching (TBLT) methodology and the reason why it is an efficient methodology for development of business language materials. I will demonstrate application of TBLT principles in developing a business language course for the Persian and Arabic languages.

12:30 pm – 1:30 pm Lunch
Frangipani Room

1:30 pm – 2:30 pm Concurrent Session III

Spanish
Location: Dogwood Room
Minicasos: Logistics and Ecological Trade Issues
T. Bruce Fryer, University of South Carolina - Beaufort
Michael Doyle, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Two mini-cases, one involving piracy in Latin American waters and another dealing with the questionable practice of shark finning, will be presented to the audience for the purpose of demonstrating how to lead the discussion of such short cases in the language classroom. Examples are in Spanish, but the procedures will be applicable to all languages.

Best Practices
Location: Sassafras Room
Educating the New Generation of Global Professionals: Achieving Higher Order Thinking Skills through Short Informational Texts
Margaret Gonglewski, George Washington University
Anna Helm, George Washington University

This presentation explores graphs and charts as powerful tools for learning higher-order thinking skills. We will demonstrate how to create authentic, original and visually engaging charts and graphs using commonly available tools, and share resources with participants that they can use when they develop similar materials for their own business language courses.

Less Commonly Taught Languages
Location: Redbud Room
Affect and Effect: The Turkish and Swahili Flagships
Alwiya S. Omar, Indiana University, Bloomington
Kemal Silay, Indiana University, Bloomington

Both Turkish and Swahili adoption lag behind Chinese as students do not typically enter university study as natural constituents of either language. There are few primary educational sources to study or acquire proficiency within the current elementary or secondary educational system. Thus, the challenges of producing highly competent cultural and linguistic ambassadors for the Flagship model differ from those of the Chinese Flagship program. In this presentation, we will discuss theoretical and affective bonds that encourage students to achieve fluency in both areas.

2:30 pm – 3:00 pm Break
Frangipani Room

3:00 pm – 4:00 pm Concurrent Session IV

Spanish
Location: Dogwood Room
Linguistically- and Culturally-Appropriate Social Media Marketing: “Radio Ambulante” as Case Study
Annie Abbott, University of Illinois

Marketing is a common unit in business language courses, but today’s business marketing strategies increasingly privilege social media marketing. This presentation will highlight some fundamentals of social media marketing then use the podcast series “Radio Ambulante” as a case study of how to use and teach linguistically- and culturally-appropriate social media marketing in a variety of platforms.

Best Practices
Location: Sassafras Room
The International Business Initiative at Eastern Michigan University: An Overview of Its Evolution and Suggestions for Its Use as a Model for Interdisciplinary Education in Language and Business
David Victor, Eastern Michigan University

This paper describes the evolution through five distinct phases of the interdisciplinary international business initiative at Eastern Michigan University, including its language and study abroad requirements. EMU’s International Business program reflects a collaborative effort from faculty across a wide range of disciplines that reach across colleges within the university. This paper explains the way in which this successful and continually evolving program was created with the hope of providing a model for developing similar curriculum development at other institutions.

Less Commonly Taught Languages
Location: Redbud Room
Legal Arabic: Principles and Syllabi
Amel Mili, University of Pennsylvania

The line between language training for business and language training for law is not clear-cut: a student who prepares to do business in a foreign language benefits from being able to read relevant legislation, read a contract, and read or write administrative correspondence that contains legal material.  This paper explores the premises and possible orientations of a course on Legal Arabic.

Arabic for Business: The Challenge of Diglossia in Teaching Arabic
Salman Al-Ani, Indiana University, Bloomington
Fred Perry, Indiana University, Bloomington

In the Arab World today, a disglossic situation is present in which varieties or dialects of the Arabic language exist and are being used simultaneously and interchangeably. There is one standard language and a number of dialects. The standard language is used as the official language in all the Arab countries. The dialects are used as daily spoken varieties for normal communication in every Arab country. We plan to make a presentation of an Arabic linguistics system for teaching of undergraduate business students. The course that we are proposing would properly prepare students to learn, understand and utilize the Arabic language in a wide variety of linguistic, cultural and business contexts.


Saturday, April 6th
7:45 am – 4:30 pm Registration and Information
Tree Suite Conference Lounge

7:00 am – 8:00 am Breakfast
Frangipani Room

8:15 am – 9:30 am Plenary Panel Discussion
Whittenberger Auditorium
Perspectives on Educating the Next Generation of Global Professionals: A Panel
David Bower, Simon-Kucher & Partners
Maria Bucur-Deckard, Indiana University, Bloomington
Idalene (Idie) F. Kesner, Indiana University, Bloomington
Dan Sirota, Cook Medical

9:30 am – 10:00 am Break
Frangipani Room

10:00 am – 11:00 am Concurrent Session V

Spanish
Location: Dogwood Room
BLRT 2012 Winner
Profiles for Success:  Service-Learning Students Helping Hispanic Entrepreneurs Formalize and Grow Their Enterprises
Darcy Lear, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

While studying the theory of business and entrepreneurship, students in two service-learning courses at UNC-CH get first-hand opportunities to apply it in practice by supporting the community group, Acción Emprendedora’s, Profiles for Success project. Students approach Hispanic micro entrepreneurs, conduct interviews in Spanish, and prepare digitally published profiles with the goal of increasing networking and attracting supporters.

How to Combine International MBA, Undergraduates and Graduates across the Curriculum in a Single Course
Diana Ruggiero, University of Memphis

The strengths of current university language programs are the valuable courses the students can take to earn their degree. These programs will benefit from the addition of new courses, such as language for specific purposes, at the undergraduate/graduate level combined. In this section, I will address the development of a graduate course in Spanish languages for specific purposes.

Best Practices
Location: Sassafras Room
Using Hybrid Interdisciplinary Study Abroad Programs to Boost Enrollments in your Language Program
Nola Senna, University of Illinois
Charles Webster, University of Illinois
CL Cole, University of Illinois

Unfortunately, today many language programs are threatened with extinction due to low enrollments. To avoid this, it is important to capitalize on interdisciplinary, on-line, and study abroad initiatives. This presentation will demonstrate a model for a study abroad program for Portuguese and Brazilian Studies in conjunction with the Advertising Department at University of Illinois, a two-week program with an intensive online component.

Chinese
Location: Redbud Room
Designing an Interactive and Integrated-Skills Task for Language and Cultural Competence
Yi Zhou, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

This presentation examines an interactive- and integrated-skills task centered on a virtual company in which heritage-and non-heritage students work collaboratively to market their product or service to potential market. It demonstrates that students have improved a number of language, cultural and business skills through researching online resources, designing and accomplishing this simulated real-life task.

11:00 am – 11:30 am Break
Frangipani Room

11:30 am – 12:30 pm Concurrent Session VI

Spanish
Location: Dogwood Room           
The Business and Culture of International Soccer
Gregory Moreland, University of Florida

Taking advantage of the fact that the 2014 World Cup is approaching, and responding to student interest in this global event, I have developed a course to be offered on campus and abroad, in both English and Spanish. In this session, I will present the English-language version of the syllabus, and will engage the audience in dialogue about the important economic and cultural ramifications of international soccer.

Best Practices
Location: Sassafras
Promoting Authentic Cross-Cultural Communication through Technology
Geraldine Lebaudy, University of Pennsylvania

The session will describe two technology-based models that connect business language students to professionals as a means of promoting authentic communicative, cross-cultural interactions. I will describe how to implement and incorporate an international conversation exchange program through the use of Skype, as well as the use of teleconferencing to engage current and future students. Challenges and opportunities will be discussed.

Avoiding Cross-Cultural Misperceptions
Godwin Okebaram Uwah, College of Charleston
The presentation discusses how business language students are prepared for entry into the real world of business and how they are provided with tools and techniques to identify cultural signals and/or symbols that either facilitate or block the most elemental and yet problematic aspect of human experience—communication with focus on cultural categories that largely remain invisible to the non-initiated.

French
Location: Redbud Room
Enseigner avec la Technologie: des Activités pour Transformer la Classe de Français des Affaires
Judith Ainsworth, Université de Montréal

This presentation provides examples of technologies that enhance Business French assignments. For instance, inviting students to participate in a video dubbing project for increased oral practice, increasing class participation and response by having students practice writing appropriate responses in an email simulation, or suggesting that individual or group presentations be enhanced with Animoto, an online program for developing video slideshows.

Made in Québec, Marketed in the US
Deb S. Reisinger, Duke University
This session will showcase innovative curriculum development by presenting a new study abroad program developed to introduce students to Quebec’s unique business environment. The presenter will 1) discuss the development of the program at both an institutional and a governmental level, 2) share innovative pedagogies that integrated students into the Montreal business community, and 3) provide program assessment and marketing materials.

12:30 pm – 1:30 pm Lunch
Frangipani Room

1:30 pm – 2:30 pm Concurrent Session VII

Spanish
Dogwood Room
The Global Language Professional Curriculum at a Crossroads with Geographical Isolation, Monolingualism and a Separatist Culture
Lily Martinez, Frostburg State University

In this presentation, I discuss various ways in which instructors can bring the global to the local in courses, such as Spanish for the Professions, in communities who have an evident absence of foreign language diversity. I propose community outreach practicums at a distance, the development of new programs which result in experiential learning, and the fostering of cultural competence.

Overcoming Obstacles: Teaching Majors and Non-Majors Language for Specific Purposes
Juanita Villena-Alvarez, University of South Carolina at Beaufort

The presentation discusses the myriad obstacles to the teaching and expansion of programs in Language for Specific Purposes, with particular attention to and focus on bypassing these difficulties. The presentation will entail a discussion of programs attracting language-and non-language majors to enhance their academic background through dual majors, double degrees, and language minors/certificates, with an eye on students’ career and employment viability after graduation.

Best Practices
Location: Sassafras Room
Explore Questions that Matter through World Café: Deep Conversation in the Business Class
Diana Ruggiero, University of Memphis

Students often time have great questions in class. Other times they remain quiet when urged to ask a question. This session will focus on the importance of asking the right questions and how to create an environment that is conducive to deep meaningful conversation in the business class. Sample activities:  World Café (a teaching/learning method used to create conversation, discover and explore powerful questions, improve quality of the outcomes in the classroom, increase awareness of the power of conversation as a key business process, and using the connection between language and business more effectively for our mutual benefit).   

Less Commonly Taught Languages
Location: Redbud Room
Integrating Cross-Cultural Business Scenarios into Beginning German Language Classes at a HMI
Claudia Becker, North Carolina Central University

This presentation focuses on the effects of cross-cultural business scenarios that are systematically integrated into each lesson/unit in collegiate German-as-a-Foreign-Language courses at an HMI. Specific vocabulary, phrases, and "Redemittel", i.e., 'conversational patterns', were introduced before variations of each high-need business and/or professional scenario were performed by learners. Similarities and differences to US-American Business contexts were noted. Ultimately, study-abroad students' reflections on the usefulness of those 'rehearsed' scenarios will be shared.

Best Practices for Languages for Specific Purposes
Muparrakh Musaeva, Indiana University, Bloomington
This presentation aims to presents one “involving” way of teaching Languages for Specific Purposes, particularly teaching the language as a minor-required course, rather than a major-required course. The activities are based on the particular group of learners’ needs. Thus, the teaching method is ‘learning-centered’ (Tom Hutchinson and Alan Waters, 1987). The project can be implemented in any other language than Uzbek.

2:30 pm – 3:00 pm Break
Frangipani Room

3:00 pm – 5:00 pm Workshop
Location: Dogwood Room           
Combining Language Learning with Field Application for Future Business Professionals              
Vivian Ling, Indiana University, Bloomington
Peng Wang, Georgetown University
Henghua Su, Indiana University, Bloomington
Bo Li, Indiana University, Bloomington

This workshop is based on the premise that mastery of linguistic and cultural literacy relevant to key emerging regions has become imperative for future global professionals. Topics to be covered include: the shift in paradigm for language learning, development of curriculum and experiential learning resources in response to this shift, and a report on a national-level language-based undergraduate case competition.

6:00 pm Gala Dinner & Awards Ceremony for Outstanding Business Language Research and Teaching (Cocktail Attire)
Neal-Marshall Center Grand Hall