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Indiana University Bloomington

Operations & Decision Technologies

Kelley Advantage

Our Operations, Analytics and Information Systems faculty have written many of the definitive textbooks in the areas of operations, data analysis, database management, networking, and Excel modeling.

Recent Publications

Journal Articles

Law, IT, and medical errors: Toward a National healthcare information network approach to improving patient care and reducing medical malpractice costs

2007, University of Illinois Journal of Law, Technology & Policy

John W. Hill, Arlen W. Langvardt, Anne P. Massey

Abstract

The intersection of law and information technology holds profound implications for healthcare, one of the great social policy subjects of our time. As an unacceptably high rate of medical errors continues unabated, and double-digit increases in costs make healthcare affordability increasingly problematic, old and new forces are combining to create an imperative for a national-level system of medical information connectivity that would improve healthcare quality and reduce medical malpractice costs. 1 These forces and the opportunities and obstacles they create have spawned a growing national debate, a key but insufficiently discussed facet of which pertains to the enormous potential of information technology ("IT") to reduce medical errors and their attendant malpractice costs. This Article examines the potential just noted and considers the need to modify or eliminate legal barriers to the full realization of that potential.

Medical malpractice cases and the costs thereof are not new topics of public discourse. 2 Such issues re-emerged in the 2004 presidential campaign, when an alleged malpractice liability "crisis" became a political football, and liability insurance premiums of healthcare providers ("HCPs") were asserted to have reached unacceptably high levels. 3 The Bush Administration's proposed solution to the supposed crisis, offered during the 2004 campaign and reiterated since the election, centered on capping non-economic damages in malpractice cases at $ 250,000. 4 Such caps are anything but novel and are premised on the assumption - whose validity is contested by critics - that big damage awards and monetary settlements in malpractice cases ...

Citation

Hill, J. W., A. W. Langvardt, and A. P. Massey (2007), "Law, IT, and medical errors: Toward a National healthcare information network approach to improving patient care and reducing medical malpractice costs," University of Illinois Journal of Law, Technology & Policy, Volume 2007, Issue 2.